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phosphorescentt:

I am soft and lovely

(via brattyfatty)

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High-res
girlstylerevnow:

you know how us girls are
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High-res
yitzhakandtheangryinch:

SONDHEIM SAW HEATHERS
ALSO CAN WE TALK ABOUT THE MAD HINTS THEY’VE BEEN DROPPING
“off-broadway heathers”
She could’ve just said “the show” or “heathers”
Have they always called it that? Have we just started noticing now?
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Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.
  

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

(via bansheewhale)

(via waytogowonderwhore)

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hiatus-is-killing-me:

jimmypagesunderagedgirlfriend:

a tEENAGER???… withPOLITCIAL OPINIONS?? no… politics for adults. this not affect you. go sit at kids table

(5 min later) this new generation of teenagers doesn’t care about anything besides parties and the internet

(Source: controlledweirdness, via waytogowonderwhore)

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I’m really fucking tired of people assessing a show’s value based on how long it runs. The Scottsboro Boys had a beautiful production with a stellar cast in a Broadway theater, and some people loved it and some people didn’t. Same as Wicked, same as The Pirate Queen. I don’t know why every musical should have to compete with Hairspray or The Producers. Some shows are designed to do nothing more than entertain and amuse, and some shows challenge the audience in very different ways. The incredible and unexpected success of Next To Normal might well encourage musical theater writers to explore much more difficult and emotionally challenging subjects, but it does not augur an era where those shows will be financially successful. A show like Next To Normal, or The Scottsboro Boys or Parade, is always going to be a tough sell in a commercial environment, just like Schindler’s List is harder to sell than Pirates of the Caribbean. If you loved The Scottsboro Boys, then celebrate it, revel in it, and share your love for it, but most of all, be grateful for it. I hate this insane nonsense where people who say they love theater salivate over the grosses in Variety or debate the precise number of a show’s weekly nut – all that shit seems to trivialize the theater and turn it into one more stupid commodity. I got into it because theater moves me and inspires me in ways that no other art form can. Having now written several shows that were total flops in New York, I think that whether a show runs for a long time or makes any money seems like a ridiculous way to judge its success.
  Jason Robert Brown, December 22, 2010 (via jen tepper’s facebook)

(Source: newyorkshows, via limb-ovich)

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When you start seeing your worth, you’ll find it harder to stay around people who don’t.
  Worth by Emily S. P.  (via catelynstarks)

(Source: emilythefitblr, via shnanananon)

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